+3 votes
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Why did blackberry services require separate mobile Internet settings (APN blackberry.net, for example), and therefore special support from the mobile operator, while smartphones from other manufacturers (Android, iOS) were satisfied with the usual settings?
It seems to me that the point there was instant message delivery, and on the normal mobile Internet under NAT incoming connections are closed, and it is expensive to keep the session behind the NAT, polling the server is not as fast. Therefore, on a separate APN could be a special server that has access to the internal IP-addresses of the phones directly, without all the NAT and the possibility of incoming connections. A message came in, the server sends it directly to the phone's IP. And mobile IPv6 was not yet widespread back then.
And Android and iOS came later, when the networks and capabilities of mobile devices were more developed, and the requirement for prompt delivery was not so obvious (even now often mobile notifications come with a delay), and therefore a normal session from behind NATa was enough, the more it is easier and special support from the operator is not needed for this.

How did it really work?

2 Answers

0 votes
ago by
The trick was that the Blackberry needed access to their equipment installed at the carriers, while the rest of us just needed access to the Internet.
ago by
Why was it needed for blackberry and not for the rest?
ago by
Nicholas because the blackberry provided additional services for which it was needed and the others did not.
0 votes
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In Blackberry, the Internet worked through something called Blackberry Internet Services (BIS). In fact, access was arranged through a special SSL tunnel from the phone to the BIS server, within which all data was transmitted (which was described in the playbooks), but the BIS server had to be separated from ordinary subscribers.

And given the requirements of our legislation (ban on the importation of uncertified cryptocurrencies as communication equipment - on the tube will not get a certificate of conformity, you can not sell in stores, example The server should have been at the operators' place.
ago by
Nicholas ,
Maybe the presence of encryption on the Blackberry was explicitly stated, so they passed as cryptocurrencies?

First of all, it was declared explicitly and the devices came with built-in support for encryption, even without encryption of traffic during data transmission in normal mode did not work.
Secondly, in order to import and sell phones in Russia, they need to have a certificate (get a notification from the FSB, look at the registry e.g. by request of apple), as well as the PCT certificate (you can also google the registry).
And you can also look up the additional agreement for BIS service, for example, at Beeline .

You can also read, which scheme agreed upon by the regulator. The point is that devices with their own encryption channels connect only to the server installed at the operator.
ago by
Encryption tools are used everywhere nowadays, and in google/apple services too (HTTPS and QUIC at least). Of course, the government wants to reach them too, but it will be difficult, and it will not be possible to block these services without consequences.
So I don't think that's the deciding factor. Maybe the presence of encryption in Blackberry was explicitly declared, so they were passed as crypto tools? as well as in the usual most common messengers (watsap and telegram) the presence of encryption is also declared, not to mention the applications for geeks like Tox and Jami.
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